This Month in Research June 2010

This Month in Research June 2010

This is the first month of a new feature I am going to start on the site called This Month in Research(better name suggestions welcome!). I will send something out once a month as a sort of a roundup of research articles I have come across. As ever if you find something (or have written something) worth sharing just leave a comment below and I can include it in the next month.

1. Game-related statistics that discriminated winning, drawing and losing teams from the Spanish soccer league. (JSSM)

Abstract: The aim of the present study was to analyze men’s football competitions, trying to identify which game-related statistics allow to discriminate winning, drawing and losing teams. The sample used corresponded to 380 games from the 2008-2009 season of the Spanish Men’s Professional League. The game-related statistics gathered were: total shots, shots on goal, effectiveness, assists, crosses, offsides commited and received, corners, ball possession, crosses against, fouls committed and received, corners against, yellow and red cards, and venue. Read More

2. Rugby game-related statistics that discriminate between winning and losing teams in IRB and Super Twelve close games. (JSSM)

Abstract: The aim of the current study was to identify the Rugby game- related statistics that discriminated between winning and losing teams in IRB and S12 close games. Archival data reported to game-related statistics from 120 IRB games and 204 Super Twelve games played between 2003 and 2006. Afterwards, a cluster analysis was conducted to establish, according to game final score differences, three different match groups. Only the close games group was selected for further analysis (IRB n = 64 under 15 points difference and Super Twelve n = 95 under 11 points difference). Read More…

3. The effects of approach angle on penalty kicking accuracy and kick kinematics with recreational soccer players.(JSSM)

Abstract: Kicking accuracy is an important component of successful penalty kicks, which may be influenced by the approach angle. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of approach angle on kicking accuracy and three-dimensional kinematics of penalty kicks. Seven male amateur recreational soccer players aged (mean ± s) 26 ± 3 years, body mass 74.0 ± 6.8 kg, stature 1.74 ± 0.06 m, who were right foot dominant, kicked penalties at a 0.6 x 0.6 m target in a full size goal from their self-selected approach angle, 30º, 45º and 60º (direction of the kick was 0º). Read More…

4. Analysis of team performances at the ICC World Twenty20 Cup 2009 (IJPAS)

Abstract: Cricket has evolved in recent years and has resulted in the emergence of Twenty20 cricket. We examined the batting, bowling and fielding variables associated with success in cricket in the recent Twenty20 World Cup. We compared several key batting and bowling variables of winning and non-winning teams by comparing the magnitudes of differences (Cohen’s effect size). We established several moderate or large differences between winning and losing teams with respect to batting, bowling and fielding variables. The best indicators of success in the tournament can be broken down into general match, batting and fielding variables. Read More…

5. Profile of position movement demands in elite junior Australian Rules Footballers. (JSSM)

Abstract: This study investigated the positional movement patterns in elite junior Australian Football (AF). Thirty players (17.1 ± 0.9 years) participating in this study were tracked over seven home games of the regular 2006 Victorian junior (Under 18) league season. Using lapsed-time video analysis, each position for an entire match was videotaped on three separate occasions over the course of the season. Data analysed included the number of individual efforts, duration and frequency of efforts; distance and percentage time for the classifications of standing, walking jogging, running and sprinting. Read More…

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